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    Located on lovely, leafy Pitshanger Lane. We stock over 3000 titles. As well as books, we sell cards, wrapping paper, stationery and games.
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    Everybody that works here lives locally. We all love the area and we all love books so please feel free to ask if there's anything you need.
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Book of the Week

Milk of Paradise by Lucy Inglis

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Poppy tears, opium, heroin, fentanyl: humankind has been in thrall to the `Milk of Paradise' for millennia. The latex of papaver somniferum is a bringer of sleep, of pleasurable lethargy, of relief from pain - and hugely addictive. A commodity without rival, it is renewable, easy to extract, transport and refine, and subject to an insatiable global demand. No other substance in the world is as simple to produce or as profitable. It is the basis of a gargantuan industry built upon a shady underworld, but ultimately it is a farm-gate material that lives many lives before it reaches the branded blister packet, the intravenous drip or the scorched and filthy spoon. Many of us will end our lives dependent on it. In Milk of Paradise, acclaimed cultural historian Lucy Inglis takes readers on an epic journey from ancient Mesopotamia to modern America and Afghanistan, from Sanskrit to pop, from poppy tears to smack, from morphine to today's synthetic opiates. It is a tale of addiction, trade, crime, sex, war, literature, medicine and, above all, money. And, as this ambitious, wide-ranging and compelling account vividly shows, the history of opium is our history and it speaks to us of who we are.


Book at Bedtime

Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont by Elizabeth Taylor

Image for Mrs Palfrey At The Claremont : A Virago Modern Classic

A humorous and compassionate look at friendship between an old woman and a young man. On a rainy Sunday in January, the recently widowed Mrs Palfrey arrives at the Claremont Hotel where she will spend her remaining days. Her fellow residents are magnificently eccentric and endlessly curious, living off crumbs of affection and snippets of gossip. Together, upper lips stiffened, they fight off their twin enemies: boredom and the Grim Reaper. Then one day Mrs Palfrey strikes up an unlikely friendship with an impoverished young writer, Ludo, who sees her as inspiration for his novel.

Women's Prize for Fiction 

Image for Home Fire : SHORTLISTED FOR THE WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION 2018

Kamila Shamsie has won the 2018 Women's Prize for Fiction for her seventh novel Home Fire.

She said: "Home Fire is about identity, conflicting loyalties, love and politics. And it sustains mastery of its themes and its form.

The novel is essentially a reworking of Antigone by Sophocles. Isma is free. After years spent raising her twin siblings in the wake of their mother's death, she is finally studying in America, resuming a dream long deferred. But she can't stop worrying about Aneeka, her beautiful, headstrong sister back in London - or their brother, Parvaiz, who's disappeared in pursuit of his own dream: to prove himself to the dark legacy of the jihadist father he never knew. Then Eamonn enters the sisters' lives. Handsome and privileged, he inhabits a London worlds away from theirs. As the son of a powerful British Muslim politician, Eamonn has his own birthright to live up to - or defy. Is he to be a chance at love? The means of Parvaiz's salvation? Two families' fates are inextricably, devastatingly entwined in this searing novel that asks: what sacrifices will we make in the name of love?A contemporary reimagining of Sophocles' Antigone, 

These are the books that were most popular with our customers last week......

Image for Little Fires Everywhere : The New York Times Top Ten Bestseller

1. Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

2. Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari

3. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

4. Mythos by Stephen Fry

5. Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls

6. Factfulness by Hans Rosling

7. Beautiful Animals by Lawrence Osbourne

8. The Last Hours by Minette Walters

9. Pebbles on the Beach by Clarence Ellis

10. London Rules by Mick Herron

If you would like to read any of these books, please send us a message from our contacts page, and we will reserve a copy for you.

Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

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When a mysterious package is delivered to Robin Ellacott, she is horrified to discover that it contains a woman's severed leg.Her boss, private detective Cormoran Strike, is less surprised but no less alarmed. There are four people from his past who he thinks could be responsible - and Strike knows that any one of them is capable of sustained and unspeakable brutality.With the police focusing on the one suspect Strike is increasingly sure is not the perpetrator, he and Robin take matters into their own hands, and delve into the dark and twisted worlds of the other three men. But as more horrendous acts occur, time is running out for the two of them...A fiendishly clever mystery with unexpected twists around every corner, Career of Evil is also a gripping story of a man and a woman at a crossroads in their personal and professional lives. You will not be able to put this book down.

Books by local authors

There are many talented authors in the neighbourhood who have written books on all sorts of subjects. This eclectic list includes:-

Faye Bird

My Second Life

What I Couldn't Tell You?


Lil Chase

Boys for Beginners

Secrets, Lies and Locker 62

Lara's Secret

Abby's Shadow

Obi's Secret


Kevin Clarke

Off Beam Off Side Off Menu


Harald J Copenhagen

Trust Me, I'm a Doctor


Sherard Cowper-Coles

Cables from Kabul

Ever the Diplomat


Robin Duval

Bear in the Woods

Below the Thunder

Not Single Spies


Sue Elliott

The Children who Fought Hitler

Love Child

Britain's Greatest Generation


Richard Fawkes

Don Bouciault

The Classical Music Map of Britain


Christine Eborall

Stitch-up in Ealing


Alex Gerlis

The Best of our Spies

The Swiss Spy

Vienna Spies


Daphne Gloag

A Compression of Distances

Beginnings


Giles Goodland

Capital

The Dumb Messengers


Anne Harvey

Remembering Christmas

Party Pieces

Like Sorrow or a Tune


Veronica Heley

False Money

False Picture

Murder by Mistake

Murder in Mind


Mahmud Kianush

Through the Window of the Taj Mahal

The Songs of Man

The Amber Shell of Self


Jennifer C. Kelsey

A Voice of Discontent

Changing the Rules


Rory Kilalea

Colours


Sean Magee

Desert Island Discs


Jeffrey Pack

The Enigma of 13 Sandown Road: a Botanical Mystery

Love is the Air

This House


Ian D Richardson

The Mortal Maze


George Szlachetko

Wira of Warsaw


David Young

Stasi Child

Young adults

My Messed-Up Life by Susan Nielsen

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Violet is not impressed with her TV director dad: he's decided to abandon his family in Vancouver to start over with a new younger wife in LA.

To Violet, it's like he's traded his old life for a better one - complete with new and improved children.

To make matters worse, her mom has taken up with a dorky new man called Dudley Wiener.

Violet decides to take control.

She needs a new stepfather who is perfect, charming and will show Dad what he's missing: she needs George Clooney, Hollywood superstar.


The Colour of the Sun by David Almond

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This is a moving, funny, inspirational and magical novel from the bestselling author of Skellig. "The day is long, the world is wide, you're young and free."One hot summer morning, Davie steps boldly out of his front door. The world he enters is very familiar - the little Tyneside town that has always been his home - but as the day passes, it becomes ever more mysterious. A boy has been killed, and Davie thinks he might know who is responsible. He turns away from the gossip and excitement and sets off roaming towards the sunlit hills above the town. As the day goes on, the real and the imaginary start to merge, and Davie knows that neither he nor his world will ever be the same again.

This an outstanding novel full of warmth and light, from a multi-award-winning author. David Almond says: 'I guess it embodies my constant astonishment at being alive in this beautiful, weird, extraordinary world.'


The Truth and Lies of Ella Black by Emily Barr

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Ella Black seems to live the life most other seventeen-year-olds would kill for . . .

Until one day, telling her nothing, her parents whisk her off to Rio de Janeiro.

Determined to find out why, Ella takes her chance and searches through their things. And realises her life has been a lie. Her mother and father aren't hers at all.

Unable to comprehend the truth, Ella runs away, to the one place they'll never think to look - the favelas.

But there she learns a terrible secret - the truth about her real parents and their past.

And the truth about a mother, desperate for a daughter taken from her seventeen years ago . . .


La Belle Sauvage: The Book of Dust Volume 1 by Philip Pullman

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Eleven-year-old Malcolm Polstead and his daemon, Asta, live with his parents at the Trout Inn near Oxford.

Across the River Thames (which Malcolm navigates often using his beloved canoe, a boat by the name of La Belle Sauvage) is the Godstow Priory where the nuns live.

Malcolm learns they have a guest with them; a baby by the name of Lyra Belacqua .


A Skinful of Shadows by Francis Hardinge

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When a creature dies, its spirit can go looking for somewhere to hide.

Some people have space inside them, perfect for hiding.

Makepeace, a courageous girl with a mysterious past, defends herself nightly from the ghosts which try to possess her. Then a dreadful event causes her to drop her guard for a moment.

And now there's a ghost inside her.

The spirit is wild, brutish and strong, but it may be her only defence in a time of dark suspicion and fear. As the English Civil War erupts, Makepeace must decide which is worse: possession - or death.


Turtles all the Way Down by John Green

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Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there's a hundred thousand dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate.

So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett's son, Davis.Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.

In his long-awaited return, John Green, the acclaimed, award-winning author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, shares Aza's story with shattering, unflinching clarity in this brilliant novel of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship.


Things a Bright Girl can Do by Sally Nicholls

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Through rallies and marches, in polite drawing rooms and freezing prison cells and the poverty-stricken slums of the East End, three courageous young women join the fight for the vote. Evelyn is seventeen, and though she is rich and clever, she may never be allowed to follow her older brother to university. Enraged that she is expected to marry her childhood sweetheart rather than be educated, she joins the Suffragettes, and vows to pay the ultimate price for women's freedom. May is fifteen, and already sworn to the cause, though she and her fellow Suffragists refuse violence. When she meets Nell, a girl who's grown up in hardship, she sees a kindred spirit. Together and in love, the two girls start to dream of a world where all kinds of women have their place. But the fight for freedom will challenge Evelyn, May and Nell more than they ever could believe. As war looms, just how much are they willing to sacrifice?


Wolf Children by Paul Dowswell

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It is July 1945, Hitler's Third Reich has fallen, and Berlin is in ruins. Living on the edge of survival in the cellar of an abandoned hospital, Otto and his ragtag gang of kids have banded together in the desperate, bombed-out city.

The war may be over, but danger lurks in the shadows of the wreckage as Otto and his friends find themselves caught between invading armies, ruthless rival gangs and a strange Nazi war criminal who stalks them ...

A climactic story of truth, friendship and survival against the odds, Wolf Children will thrill readers of Michael Morpurgo and John Boyne.


My Second Life by Faye Bird

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'The first time I was born, I was born Emma Trees. I had everything to live for. But I died. I was twenty-two.' Ana struggles to live a normal life, bombarded by memories of her previous life as Emma. The worst memories are of a little girl who drowned: was Emma responsible? Consumed by guilt, Ana will do anything to uncover the past.

We love this book, written by lovely local author, Faye Bird, and also recommend her latest paperback, 'What I Couldn't Tell You' -  just out.

Children's Books

The World's Worst Children 3 by David Walliams

Image for The World's Worst Children 3 : Fiendishly Funny New Short Stories for Fans of David Walliams Books

From the phenomenal number-one bestseller David Walliams comes another collection of more hilariously horrible children! Illustrated in glorious and gruesome colour by artist genius, Tony Ross, these stories will appal and delight young readers. Just when you thought it was safe to go back to your bookshelf, 10 more horrendously hilarious stories about the absolute worst children ever! From ten-year old Hank and his endless pranks on his poor, long-suffering family, to Tandy and her titanic tantrums - this brand new collection is the perfect companion to World's Worst Children books 1 and 2 and an ideal gift for the worst children in your life! This compendium of catastrophically horrid boys and girls is brought to you by the phenomenal number-one bestseller David Walliams, and every story is illustrated in glorious and gruesome colour by the artistic genius Tony Ross. 2018 marks the 10th anniversary of the publication of David Walliams' first novel, The Boy in the Dress.


How to Measure Everything by Dorling Kindersley

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Children learn how to measure everything including length, weight, volume, temperature, and time through pop-ups and flaps in this fun and educational activity book. There's even a life-size ruler on the jacket! Measuring is a key maths topic for early learners, and this book supports KS1 concepts. This bold and bright book helps kids understand the language and maths of measuring. Fun and simple lift-the-flap puzzles help kids to relate measuring to everyday life - from measuring lengths of pencils with a ruler to weighing fruit on scales. Other activities include a wheel with a clock face to help kids learn to tell the time. How to Measure Everything concludes with a colourful bedroom picture with a quiz that gets you to measure and compare lots of things in the scene. How to Measure Everything engages with a key maths topic in a new, interactive, and playful way.


The Boy at the Back of the Class by Onjali Q. Rauf

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Told with heart and humour, The Boy at the Back of the Class is a child's perspective on the refugee crisis, highlighting the importance of friendship and kindness in a world that doesn't always make sense.

There used to be an empty chair at the back of my class, but now a new boy called Ahmet is sitting in it. He's nine years old (just like me), but he's very strange. He never talks and never smiles and doesn't like sweets - not even lemon sherbets, which are my favourite!But then I learned the truth: Ahmet really isn't very strange at all. He's a refugee who's run away from a War. A real one. With bombs and fires and bullies that hurt people. And the more I find out about him, the more I want to help. That's where my best friends Josie, Michael and Tom come in.

Because you see, together we've come up with a plan. . .


Oi Cat! by Kes Gray

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The laughter never ends with Oi Frog and friends ...

Don't miss this hilarious follow-up to Oi Frog! and Oi Dog! from the award-winning Kes Gray and Jim Field.

A brilliant rhyming read-aloud text, jam-packed with animals and silliness - perfect for children and parents alike.

According to Frog ... Cats sit on gnats, Dogs sit on logs, Raccoons sit on macaroons, Armadillos sit on pillows and Chicks sit on bricks.

But wait! Cat doesn't like sitting on gnats, they keep biting his bottom!

Will Frog and Dog help him change the rules?


Mud by Emily Thomas

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It's 1979, and thirteen-year-old Lydia has no idea how she'll cope when her dad announces that the family has to sell up and move onto a Thames sailing barge in Essex. With his girlfriend. And her three kids. Between trying to keep her clothes dry in a leaky cabin, disastrous hair-dye attempts, awkward encounters with local boys, and coping with her suddenly enormous and troublesome family, Lydia fears she'll sink rather than swim . . .

At turns heartbreaking and uplifting, through Lydia's innocent and perceptive voice we find out that while the mud may stick, the tide can turn - and in unexpected and joyful ways.

Perfect for fans of Louise Rennison, Hilary McKay and Rae Earl


Undercover Princess by Connie Glynn

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Lottie Pumpkin is an ordinary girl who longs to be a princess, attending Rosewood Hall on a scholarship.

Ellie Wolf is a princess who longs to be ordinary, attending Rosewood Hall to avoid her royal duties in the kingdom of Maradova.

When fate puts the two fourteen-year-olds in the same dorm, it seems like a natural solution to swap identities: after all, everyone mistakenly believes Lottie to be the princess anyway.

But someone's on to their secret, and at Rosewood nothing is ever as it seems...


How to be Good at Science, Technology and Engineering

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Little scientists will understand science in seconds with this essential homework-helping guide. Learn about everything from molecules and magnetism to rockets and radio waves and find out how a hot-air balloon rises, how erosion flattens mountains, how light waves zip through space, and how the human eye sees colours! With STEM (science, technology, engineering, and maths) subjects ever more important in today's technological world, How to be Good at Science, Technology, and Engineering is the perfect book to inspire and educate inquisitive young minds and prepare them for the future. This is the perfect homework guide for parents and their children, with all core curriculum areas of science included. Cool illustrations show the appliance of science in the real world: see how microchips, tractors, and suspension bridges work. Hands-on projects feature fun experiments to try at home or school: try polishing old coins in vinegar, or make an erupting volcano with baking soda.


Joan Proctor: Dragon Doctor by Patricia Valdez

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Back in the days of long skirts and afternoon teas, young Joan Procter entertained the most unusual party guests: slithery and scaly ones, who turned over teacups and crawled past the crumpets... While other girls played with dolls, Joan preferred the company of reptiles. She carried her favorite lizard with her everywhere - she even brought a crocodile to school!When Joan grew older, she became the Curator of Reptiles at the Natural History Museum. She went on to design the Reptile House at the London Zoo, including a home for the rumored-to-be-vicious komodo dragons. There, just like when she was a little girl, Joan hosted children's tea parties - with her komodo dragon as the guest of honour. With a lively text and vibrant illustrations, scientist and writer Patricia Valdez and illustrator Felicita Sala bring to life Joan Procter's inspiring story of passion and determination.


Paddington at St Paul's by Michael Bond

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Celebrate the 60th anniversary of Paddington, the much-loved bear from Darkest Peru, with this brand new classic picture book.

Paddington is now a major movie star!

For six decades, stories of Paddington Bear have delighted children all over the world.

When Mr Gruber takes Paddington on a special outing to St Paul's Cathedral, there is one surprise after another.

But the biggest of all comes when Paddington is mistaken for a choir bear and suddenly finds himself joining the choir for a most unusual rehearsal!


The Racehorse who Disappeared by Clare Balding

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Clare Balding's second brilliant adventure for Charlie Bass and her funny family of humans and animals.

Life is slowly getting back to normal for Charlie after her reluctant racehorse, Noble Warrior, won the Derby and saved her family from financial ruin.

But drama soon returns to Folly Farm when thieves break into the farmyard in the dead of night and kidnap Noble Warrior!

With the police baffled and no trace of the prizewinning thoroughbred to be found, Charlie launches her own investigation...


Tom Gates: Biscuits, Bands and Very Big Plans by Tom Gates

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The bestselling fully-illustrated Tom Gates series is back with a new book!

This book is VERY important because it contains BISCUITS, BANDS and all my (doodled) plans to make DogZombies the BEST band in the world.

MY VERY BIG PLAN:

1. Write more songs about VERY important things like... ... biscuits

2. Make sure there's a good supply of SNACKS for our band practice

3. Avoid Delia at ALL COSTS, she thinks I've been SNOOPING in her room. (I have.)

4. DOODLE as much as possible, especially if Marcus is watching The 14th book in this HILARIOUS series!


Cinderella of the Nile by Beverley Naidoo

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Beautifully retold by the award-winning author Beverley Naidoo, this earliest known version of Cinderella is brought to life for the modern-day reader.

Rhodopis is a Greek girl who is sold into slavery by bandits and taken to Egypt.

Along the way she becomes friends with the storyteller Aesop and a host of playful animals. Her master gives her a pair of beautiful rose-red slippers, making three other servants jealous.

But when Horus, the falcon, sweeps in to steal her slipper, Rhodopis has little idea that this act will lead her to the King of Egypt.

The first in the `One Story, Many Voices' series, this ancient story of Cinderella finds its echo in fairy tales all over the world.


Boats are Busy

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A first book of boats for the youngest enthusiasts, featuring 15 different boats and a bonus nautical flag per vessel

From sailboats to ferry boats, tankers to clippers, young readers will learn to identify and define a range of floating crafts. Each of 15 boats and ships are presented by name, illustration, and simple description, written as engaging, read-aloud text.

In addition, each is adorned with a different nautical flag whose message is decoded as secondary text for the extra curious.

Printed in four stunning Pantone colors, this refreshingly stylish and informative introduction to boats will pop off the shelf in the "things that go" section!


Daddy Long Legs by Nadine Brun-Crosme

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The car had trouble starting this morning.

It gets Matty to nursery, but what if later it won't start at all . . . how will Dad pick him up?

Matty is very worried.

But Dad soon puts Matty's fears to rest with a series of increasingly imaginative suggestions for alternative modes of transport - from a tractor to a dragon, a polar bear to a rowing boat. But, if all else fails, he'll come on foot . . . because to come and pick up Matty, Dad's legs will never be too tired. Daddy Long Legs is a joyous book with bright, fresh and funny artwork from uniquely talented French illustrator Aurelie Guillerey, full of retro charm.

With its warm, reassuring feel and the adorably drawn relationship between a father and his child, Nadine Brun-Cosme's adorable story makes the perfect book for Father's Day and beyond.


The Secret of the Night Train by Sylvia Bishop

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One small girl - one BIG adventure.

When Max is sent to Istanbul to stay with her boring Great Aunt-Elodie, little does she expect to be plunged into a thrilling night-time adventure across Europe.

And when the mysterious Heartbreak Diamond goes missing, Max must find her feet in a whirling world of would-be diamond smugglers, thieves and undercover detectives.

Will she discover the real diamond thief before they reach their destination?

Or does the answer lie closer to home...

Perfect for fans of THE WOLF WILDER and COGHEART, this is Sylvia Bishop writing at her quirky, brilliant best.


Space Tortoise by Ross Montgomery

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Once, in an old rusty bin in an old rusty playground in an old empty park.. there lived a little tortoise.

But Tortoise is lonely. He's never seen any other tortoises, and wonders where they could all be hiding. Then, one day, he looks up and the night sky, and sees a million blinking lights winking at him. "That must be where the other tortoises are - at the top of the sky! I wish I could join them."

But how can a little tortoise get to the top of the sky?

And so begins a magical journey... A beautiful, moving and heartwarming tale about bravery, kindness and welcoming strangers, from the team behind The Building Boy.


Barry Loser is the Best at Football - Not! by Jim Smith

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The tenth book in the brilliant Roald Dahl Funny Prize winning BARRY LOSER series.

Perfect for readers aged 7-10 years old and fans of Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Tom Gates, Dennis the Menace and Pamela Butchart's Wigglesbottom Primary series.

Everyone at Barry's school has gone football crazy, but Barry gets thrown out of the team (the Mogden Maniacs) for being completeerly rubbish.

Then it turns out that his best friend Bunky is a super striker - so Barry becomes his manager.

The cup final match is approaching and Bunky's getting carried away with his football fame - can Barry keep his head in the game?J


Stick Dog Crashes a Party by Tom Watson

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Perfect for fans of Big Nate, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and the previous Stick Dog books, Tom Watson's hilarious series continues with Stick Dog Crashes a Party-a festive adventure complete with cake, ribs, fireworks, and very special guests!IT'S TIME TO PARTY-STICK DOG STYLE!Stick Dog and his hungry pals have found plenty of tasty treats at Picasso Park before. But it's never looked like it does on this dark, dark night. Strings of white lights, colorful fireworks, and an endless buffet of amazing food have transformed the park into a food-snatching wonderland.There's a party going on, and Stick Dog, Mutt, Poo-Poo, Stripes, and Karen are ready to crash it. But how will they do it?It will take a top-notch strategy, some good luck, and a little help from two charming cats to complete their mission. It's another smart, hilarious romp for Stick Dog and his team of strays.


The Kingfisher Football Encyclopedia

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The 2018 World Cup edition of The Kingfisher Football Encyclopedia captures the triumph and despair of key moments in world football. Packed with pictures and profiles of the world's most skilful footballers - old and new - from Beckham to Messi, Pele to Ronaldo, Rooney to Neymar. Over 40 of the best international and national teams to have lit up the game are covered in detail, including Brazil, Manchester United, Barcelona and Spain.All the drama of the 'beautiful game' is fully analysed with dynamic full-spread photos and digital artworks that recreate famous moves and goals, while each chapter includes links to websites, providing a valuable access point to databases of players, international results, all the major tournaments, and club histories. Includes in-depth coverage of every aspect of football, including rules and skills; fans and the media; managers and tactics. Packed with the latest statistics on the 'beautiful game', including an updated report on EURO 16, this is a superbly detailed reference book for all the family. Includes a pull-out WORLD CUP 2018 wallchart to fill in as the tournament progresses.


Stories for Boys who Dare to be Different by Ben Brooks

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Prince charming, dragon slayer, mischievous prankster... More often than not, these are the role-models boys encounter in the books they read at home and at school. As a boy, there is an assumption that you will conform to a stereotypical idea of masculinity. But what if you're the introvert kind? What if you prefer to pick up a book rather than a sword? What if you want to cry when you're feeling sad or angry? What if you like the idea of wearing a dress?There is an ongoing crisis with regards to young men and mental health, with unhelpful gender stereotypes contributing to this malaise. Stories for Boys Who Dare to Be Different offers a welcome alternative narrative. It is an extraordinary compilation of 100 stories of famous and not-so-famous men from the past to the present day, every single one of them a rule-breaker and innovator in his own way, and all going on to achieve amazing things. Entries include Frank Ocean, Salvador Dali, Rimbaud, Beethoven, Barack Obama, Stormzy, Ai Weiwei and Jesse Owens - different sorts of heroes from all walks of life and from all over the world. A beautiful and transporting book packed with stories of adventure and wonderment, it will appeal to those who need the courage to reject peer pressure and go against the grain. It is the must-have book for all those boys who worry about stuff and all those parents who worry about their boys who worry about stuff. It will educate and entertain, while also encourage and inspire.


The Hole Story by Paul Bright

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When Hamish and Hermione Hole are chased out of the cheese where they live, they search the palace for a new place to call home.

But the Holes cause havoc wherever they go - no one wants holes in their knickers, bike wheel or boat!

Exhausted, the pair rest in a piece of wood, only to be discovered by the palace carpenter, who knows that holes can be really useful - especially when you are making beautiful musical instruments.


Noodle Head by Giles Andreae

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SILLY SAUSAGE!

SMELLY PANTS!!

NOODLE HEAD!!!

Two cheeky little friends argue over a sweetie - and things get a little out of hand in a flurry of silly name-calling that will have children in hysterics.

Will Flippy and Floppy stop being mean to each other and learn to share?

A read-aloud treat to return to again and again while absorbing the gentle message about how far a little kindness can go.


928 Miles from Home by Kim Slater

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Fourteen year old Calum Brooks has big dreams. One day, he'll escape this boring life and write movies, proper ones, with massive budgets and A-list stars. For now though, he's stuck coping alone while his dad works away, writing scripts in his head and trying to stay 'in' with his gang of mates at school, who don't like new kids, especially foreign ones.But when his father invites his new Polish girlfriend and her son, Sergei, to move in, Calum's life is turned upside down. He's actually sharing a room with 'the enemy'! How's he going to explain that to his mates? Yet when Calum is knocked down in a hit and run and breaks both legs, everything changes. Trapped at home, Calum and Sergei slowly start to understand each other, and even work together to investigate a series of break-ins at the local community centre. But Calum can't help feeling like Sergei's hiding something. Is he really trying to help, or cover up his own involvement in the crime?


The Bolds in Trouble by Julian Clary

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The Bolds are back for another hilarious tale!

This time, Teddington's wildest family have decided to stay at home and keep their heads down - it isn't always easy hiding tails and fur under clothes, and it's important not to raise suspicion amongst their human neighbours.

But trouble soon comes skulking when a very sly fox starts making a big nuisance of himself.

It's up to the Bolds to try and stop him - but the solution has them foxed...


The Grotlyn by Benji Davies

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A stunningly illustrated picture book full of mystery and suspense, from the bestselling author of The Storm Whale and Grandad's Island.

"I know when the Grotlyn's been slipping through your house unseen..."

What is the mysterious Grotlyn? What sort of creature could it be, scuttling across the town, frightening everyone in its path? And why has it stolen PC Vickers' knickers?!

A beautifully illustrated rhyming tale about things that go bump in the night for ages four and up, from picture book superstar, Benji Davies, winner of Oscar's First Book Prize 2014 and Sainsbury's Children's Book of the Year 2015.

Perfect for fans of Oliver Jeffers and Jon Klassen.


Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls 2

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100 new bedtime stories, each inspired by the life and adventures of extraordinary women from Nefertiti to Beyonce.

The unique narrative style of "Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls" transforms each biography in a fairy-tale, filling the readers with wonder and with a burning curiosity to know more about each hero.


Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History by Vashti Harrison

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Featuring 40 trailblazing black women in the world's history, this book educates and inspires as it relates true stories of women who broke boundaries and exceeded all expectations.

Debut author/illustrator Vashti Harrison pairs captivating text with stunning illustrations as she tells the stories of both iconic and lesser-known female figures of black history - from nurse Mary Seacole, to politician Diane Abbott, mathematician Katherine Johnson and singer Shirley Bassey.Among these biographies, readers will find heroes, role models and everyday women who did extraordinary things.


Do You Know about Science by Dorling Kindersley

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Over 200 intriguing science questions - answered. This is the ideal science encyclopedia to help budding Einsteins ages 6 and up with their school and homework projects - as well as for parents who need to answer those tricky science questions. Do You Know About Science? brings subjects such as the living world, human body, the material world, energy, forces and movement, and our planet to life, with colourful pages and a fun question and answer format. Where does light come from? Can I feel forces? What is my body made of? Why is lemon juice sour? Do You Know About Science? focuses on the subjects that kids really want to know about and the questions they ask, helping them easily learn new information. From everyday questions such as what makes the light turn on, to the bigger questions like what is in space, Do You Know About Science? will satisfy even the most curious minds with an amazing collection of facts.


The Return of the Railway Children by Lou Kuenzler

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Return to the magic of The Railway Children in this heartwarming sequel by Lou Kuenzler.

In the depths of WWII, 12-year-old Edie is nervous at the prospect of being sent to live with an unknown aunt whilst her mother Phyllis flies planes for the ATA.

But Aunt Roberta welcomes Edie with open arms, along with Greta and Gus, two fellow evacuees.

Together, the three children come to love their new home at Three Chimneys.

But does a dark secret lurk at the heart of the village... and are Greta and Gus hiding a secret of their own?


A Spoonful of Murder by Robin Stevens

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When Hazel Wong's beloved grandfather passes away, Daisy Wells is all too happy to accompany her friend (and Detective Society Vice President) to Hazel's family estate in beautiful, bustling Hong Kong.

But when they arrive they discover something they didn't expect: there's a new member of the Wong family. Daisy and Hazel think baby Teddy is enough to deal with, but as always the girls are never far from a mystery.

Tragedy strikes very close to home, and this time Hazel isn't just the detective. She's been framed for murder!

The girls must work together like never before, confronting dangerous gangs, mysterious suspects and sinister private detectives to solve the murder and clear Hazel's name - before it's too late . .


Dog Man and Cat Kid by Dav Pilkey

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Hot diggity dog!

Dog Man, the newest hero from the creator of Captain Underpants, is back and this time he's not alone.

The heroic hound with a real nose for justice now has a sidekick in the form of a super-cute kitten, and together they have a mysterious caper to sniff out!

When a new kitty sitter arrives and a glamorous movie starlet goes missing, it's up to Dog Man and Cat Kid to save the day!

Will these heroes stay hot on the trail, or will they be thrown off the scent and start barking up the wrong tree?


The Explorer by Katherine Rundell

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From his seat in the tiny aeroplane, Fred watches as the mysteries of the Amazon jungle pass by below him. He has always dreamed of becoming an explorer, of making history and of reading his name amongst the lists of great discoveries.

If only he could land and look about him.

As the plane crashes into the canopy, Fred is suddenly left without a choice.

He and the three other children may be alive, but the jungle is a vast, untamed place. With no hope of rescue, the chance of getting home feels impossibly small. Except, it seems, someone has been there before them ...


Women in Sport by Rachel Ignotofsky

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Women in Sport celebrates the success of the tough, bold and fearless women who paved the way for today's athletes. The sportswomen featured include well-known figures like tennis player Serena Williams and broadcaster Clare Balding, as well as lesser-known pioneers like Gertrude Ederle, the first woman to swim the English Channel, and Keiko Fukuda, the highest-ranked female judoka in history.

From the creator of the bestselling Women in Science, this richly illustrated book highlights the achievements and stories of fifty notable sportswomen from the 1800s to today, including trailblazers, Olympians and record-breakers in more than forty sports. It also contains infographics on topics such as muscle anatomy, pay and media statistics for female athletes, and influential women's teams.


Mungojerrie and Rumpelteazer by T S Eliot

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Mungojerrie and Rumpelteazer were a very notorious couple of cats.

As knockabout clowns, quick-change comedians, tight-rope walkers and acrobats.

And when you heard a dining-room smash.

Then the family would say: 'It's that horrible cat! It was Mungojerrie! and Rumpelteazer!' - And there's nothing at all to be done about that!

Join the cat-burglars Mungojerrie and Rumpleteazer in the fifth picture-book pairing from Arthur Robins and T. S. Eliot's Old Possum's cats, as they steal meat from the oven and pearls from the drawers.


Charlie and Me by Mary Lowery

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Thirteen-year-old Martin and his younger brother Charlie are on a very special journey. They're going to be travelling 421 miles all the way from Preston to the very tip of Cornwall. By train, bus and taxi, they are determined to get there in the end; and they're hoping to catch a glimpse of the dolphin that regularly visits the harbour there. But is that the only reason they are going? It's a journey that's full of challenges and surprises.

Martin adores his brother Charlie but he's not like ordinary kids. He's one in a million. He was born far too early, and ought to have died. And cheeky, irrepressible, utterly unique Charlie is always keeping Martin on his toes - especially on this crazy trip they are now on. Martin is doing his best to be a good big brother, but it's hard when there's something so huge coming once they get to Cornwall ... An unforgettable novel that is by turns funny and heartbreaking.


Radio Boy and the Revenge of Grandad by Christian O'Connell

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Debut sensation Christian O'Connell is back with more hilarious adventures of Spike, super-star radio DJ... and trouble-prone ordinary kid. The World's youngest DJ is still the talk of the town. A town that's about to turn against him. Radio Boy and his team, Artie and Holly, are back and continue to broadcast live to the world from Spike's garden shed. Then, following a shock split from Nan, Grandad Ray comes to stay. Spike decides to cheer him up by inviting him onto the show. He becomes an instant hit with the listeners and Spike keeps him on as a new team member. But things get really awkward when Spike realises Grandad Ray only has three stories and keeps telling them over and over again. Spike is forced to sack his own Grandad, who swears vengeance on his own grandson. Grandad Ray is the world's most competitive man and he


Spider by Alison Steadman

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A warm, funny look at one of the most fascinating mini-beasts, by award-winning actress and national treasure Alison Steadman OBE.

'I hate spiders!' says Rafael.

At least, he thinks so.

But when he really gets to know the BIG, HAIRY, SCARY SPIDER he finds a new, eight-legged friend.

This hilarious, action-packed look at spiders will enthrall both children and parents, with plenty of spider facts and figures throughout the book to entertain and delight.

This is Alison Steadman's first book for children.


Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Getaway by Jeff Kinney

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Greg Heffley and his family are getting out of town.

With the cold weather setting in and the stress of the Christmas holiday approaching, the Heffleys decide to escape to a tropical island resort for some much-needed rest and relaxation.

A few days in paradise should do wonders for Greg and his frazzled family.

But the Heffleys soon discover that paradise isn't everything it's cracked up to be. Sun-poisoning, stomach troubles and venomous creatures all threaten to ruin the family's vacation.

Can their trip be saved, or will this island getaway end in disaster?


Asterix and the Chariot Race by Jean Yves Ferri

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Join Asterix and Obelix on a wacky new journey with your favourite characters, packed with laughs by the bucket-load and all the usual adventure and action!

The Asterix series first appeared in the Franco-Belgian comics magazine Pilote on 29 October 1959.

It was written by René Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo until the death of Goscinny in 1977.

Uderzo then took over the writing until 2009, when he sold the rights to publishing company Hachette.

Since 2013 Jean-Yves Ferri has been the author.


Three Cheers for Women by Marcia Williams

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A celebration of inspirational women from all over the world and throughout history, told in Marcia Williams' much-loved comic-strip style.

Join Marcia Williams as she celebrates incredible women from around the world and throughout history.

From writers to warriors and astronauts to activists, discover their awesome stories and be amazed by their achievements.

Marcia Williams' much-loved comic-strip style will encourage even the most reluctant reader to enjoy this inspirational book packed with facts, quotes and jokes.


Bad Dad by David Walliams

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The new heart-warming and hilariously brilliant story from number one bestselling author David Walliams. Beautifully illustrated by artistic genius, Tony Ross. Dads come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. There are fat ones and thin ones, tall ones and short ones. There are young ones and old ones, clever ones and stupid ones. There are silly ones and serious ones, loud ones and quiet ones. Of course, there are good dads, and bad dads . . . A high-speed cops and robbers adventure with heart and soul about a father and son taking on the villainous Mr Big - and winning! This riches-to-rags story will have you on the edge of your seat and howling with laughter! Bad Dad is a fast and furious, heart-warming story of a father and son on an adventure - and a thrilling mission to break an innocent man into prison!


A Place Called Perfect by Helena Duggan

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Violet never wanted to move to Perfect.

Who wants to live in a town where everyone has to wear glasses to stop them going blind?

And who wants to be perfectly behaved all the time?

Violet quickly discovers there's something weird going on, and when she meets Boy she realizes that the mysterious Watchers are guarding a perfectly creepy secret!


Tom Gates: Epic Adventure by Liz Pichon

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The brand new hilarious and fully-illustrated instalment of the bestselling Tom Gates series!

Having two sets of grandparents is turning out to be very good for me.

The Wrinklies are keen on giving presents AND they're planning a family outing which is going to be EPIC! Even Delia wants to come.

(I can always ignore her.)


Magnus Chase and the Ship of the Dead by Rick Riordan

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Loki the trickster god is free from his chains. Now he's readying Naglfar, the Ship of the Dead, armed with a host of giants and zombies, to sail against the Norse gods and begin the final battle of Ragnarok. It's up to Magnus Chase and his friends to stop Loki's plans, but to do so they will have to sail across the oceans of Midgard, Jotunheim and Niflheim in a desperate race to reach Naglfar before it's ready to sail on Midsummer's Day. Along the way, they will face angry sea gods, hostile giants, and an evil fire-breathing dragon who happens to be a former acquaintance. But Magnus's biggest challenge will be facing his own inner demons. To defeat Loki, Magnus will need to use words, not force. This will require finding a magical elixir so deadly that it will either make Magnus Chase powerful enough to out-talk the silver-tongued Loki, or destroy Magnus utterly.


You Choose in Space by Pippa Goodhart

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Zoom off into space for an adventure where YOU CHOOSE what happens next.

Which alien would you most like to be friends with?

And what fantastically freaky food will you decide to munch for lunch?

The possibilities are infinite in this mesmerising creative toolkit which will inspire children from 3 up to make their own stories time and again - a spectacular sequel to the bestselling You Choose - it's out of this world!


Maybe by Morris Gleitzman

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The war is over and Felix, Gabriel and Anya go back to the farmhouse, only the neighbours make it quite clear that they are not welcome. After a violent scene in the market square, Felix is rescued by the military and promised a new start in Australia. And so, despite the pain of leaving Gabriek behind, Felix and Anya take their chance - maybe, just maybe, they will find safety? This powerfully moving addition to Morris Gleitzman's bestselling series takes place in 1945, following directly on from the story told in SOON.This intensely affecting story will move readers of all ages. It will be welcomed by the many Holocaust educators who use Once, Now, Then and After to teach upper primary and lower secondary children and embraced by any reader who loves passionate, moving and brilliant stories.


The Ugly Five by Julia Donaldson

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Who's that singing on the savannah?

It's the top-five ugly animals in Africa!

The wildebeest, warthog, vulture, hyena and marabou stork swagger proudly across the savannah, rejoicing in their ugliness - and delighting their babies, who think they're perfect just the way they are.

Inspired by the real-life Ugly Five safari animals, Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler's brand-new picture book is a jubilant celebration of animals who are often rather unloved.

The funny, heart-warming rhyme is a joy to read aloud, while bold, comical illustrations bring the savannah spectacularly to life.


Goth Girl and the Sinister Symphony by Chris Riddell

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There are musical goings-on at Ghastly-Gorm Hall and another spooky mystery for Ada Goth to solve in the fourth book in the Goth Girl series by Chris Riddell, Children's Laureate 2015-2017.

Lord Goth is throwing a music festival at Ghastly-Gorm Hall, with performances from the finest composers in the land.

Ada can't wait, but it's quite distracting when her grandmother is trying to find her father a fashionable new wife, there's a faun living in her wardrobe and Maltravers is up to his old tricks.

Ada must make sure everything goes to plan, and luckily help is at hand from a very interesting house guest ...


Non-fiction - a selection of the latest

The Pebbles on the Beach by Clarence Ellis

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This edition includes a foreword by Robert Macfarlane. There is a handy illustrated guide to identifying pebbles on the reverse of the book jacket. Pebble-hunting is a pleasant hobby that makes little demand upon one's patience and still less upon one's physical energy. (You may even enjoy the hunt from the luxurious sloth of a deck chair). One of the true delights of the pebble-seeker is to read the stories in the stones - to determine whence and by what means they came to be there. We must always bear in mind that a pebble is a transient thing. It is in the half-way stage of a long existence . . . This is a book about the simple pleasure of pebble spotting. Clarence Ellis is a charming, knowledgeable and witty guide to everything you didn't know there was to know about pebbles. He ruminates on what a pebble actually is, before showing us how they are formed, advising on the best pebble-spotting grounds in the UK, helping to identify individual stones, and giving tips on the necessary kit. You'll know your chert from your schist, your onyx from your agate, and will be on your guard for artificial intruders before you know it. Understanding the humble pebble makes a trip to the beach, lake-side or river bank simply that little bit more fascinating.


Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari

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Planet Earth is 4.5 billion years old. In just a fraction of that time, one species among countless others has conquered it. Us. We are the most advanced and most destructive animals ever to have lived. What makes us brilliant? What makes us deadly? What makes us Sapiens? In this bold and provocative book, Yuval Noah Harari explores who we are, how we got here and where we're going. Sapiens is a thrilling account of humankind's extraordinary history - from the Stone Age to the Silicon Age - and our journey from insignificant apes to rulers of the world 'It tackles the biggest questions of history and of the modern world, and it is written in unforgettably vivid language. You will love it!' Jared Diamond, author of Guns, Germs and Steel 'Unbelievably good. Jaw dropping from the first word to the last' Chris Evans, BBC Radio 2 Yuval's follow up to Sapiens, Homo Deus, is available now.


I am, I am, I am by Maggie O'Farrell

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A memoir with a difference - the unputdownable story of an extraordinary woman's life in near-death experiences.

Insightful, inspirational, gorgeously written, it is a book to be read at a sitting, a story you finish newly conscious of life's fragility, determined to make every heartbeat count. A childhood illness she was not expected to survive. A teenage yearning to escape that nearly ended in disaster. A terrifying encounter on a remote path. A mismanaged labour in an understaffed hospital. Shocking, electric, unforgettable, this is the extraordinary memoir from Costa Novel-Award winner and Sunday Timesbestselling author Maggie O'Farrell.

It is a book to make you question yourself.


Lonely Courage by Rick Stroud

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On 18 June 1940 General de Gaulle broadcast from London to his countrymen in France about the catastrophe that had overtaken their nation - the victory of the invading Germans. He declared `Is defeat final? No! . . . the flame of French Resistance must not and will not be extinguished'. The Resistance began almost immediately. At first it was made up of small, disorganised groups working in isolation. But by the time of the liberation in 1944 around 400,000 French citizens, nearly 2 per cent of the population, were involved. The Special Operations Executive (SOE) set up by Winston Churchill in 1941 saw its role in France as helping the Resistance by recruiting and organising guerrilla fighters; supplying and training them; and then disrupting the invaders by any means necessary. The basic SOE unit was a team of three: a leader, a wireless operator and a courier. These teams operated in Resistance circuits and the agents were given random codenames. The aim of this work was to prepare for the invasion of Europe by Allied forces and the eventual liberation of France. It was soon decided that women would play a vital role. There were 39 female agents recruited from all walks of life, ranging from a London shop assistant to a Polish aristocrat. What linked them was that they knew France well, were fluent in French and were prepared to sacrifice everything to help defeat the enemy. The women trained alongside the men, learning how to disappear into the background, how to operate a radio transmitter and how to kill a man with their bare hands. Once trained they were infiltrated behind the lines by parachute or tiny aircraft that could land in remote fields. Some of the women went on to lead thousands of Resistance fighters, while others were arrested, brutally interrogated and sent to concentration camps where they endured torment and death. Lonely Courage tells their story and sheds light on what life was really like for these brave women who tumbled from the sky.


Calypso by David Sedaris

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If you've ever laughed your way through David Sedaris's cheerfully misanthropic stories, you might think you know what you're getting with Calypso. You'd be wrong. When he buys a beach house on the Carolina coast, Sedaris envisions long, relaxing vacations spent playing board games and lounging in the sun with those he loves most. And life at the Sea Section, as he names the vacation home, is exactly as idyllic as he imagined, except for one tiny, vexing realization: it's impossible to take a vacation from yourself. With Calypso, Sedaris sets his formidable powers of observation toward middle age and mortality. Make no mistake: these stories are very, very funny - it's a book that can make you laugh 'til you snort, the way only family can. Sedaris's writing has never been sharper, and his ability to shock readers into laughter unparalleled. But much of the comedy here is born out of that vertiginous moment when your own body betrays you and you realize that the story of your life is made up of more past than future. This is beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk and love a good tumour joke. Calypso is simultaneously Sedaris's darkest and warmest book yet - and it just might be his very best.


Watling Street by John Higgs

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A journey along one of Britain's oldest roads, from Dover to Anglesey, in search of the hidden history that makes us who we are today. 'A bravura piece of writing - Bill Bryson on acid' Tom HollandWinding its way from the White Cliffs of Dover to the Druid groves of Anglesey, the ancient road of Watling Street has gone by many different names. It is a road of witches and ghosts, of queens and highwaymen, of history and myth, of Bletchley Park codebreakers, Chaucer, Boudicca, Dickens and James Bond. But Watling Street is not just the story of a route across our island. It is an acutely observed exploration of Britain and who we are today, told with wit and an unerring eye for the curious and surprising.


Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig

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The world is messing with our minds.

Rates of stress and anxiety are rising.

A fast, nervous planet is creating fast and nervous lives.

We are more connected, yet feel more alone.

And we are encouraged to worry about everything from world politics to our body mass index. - How can we stay sane on a planet that makes us mad? - How do we stay human in a technological world?- How do we feel happy when we are encouraged to be anxious? After experiencing years of anxiety and panic attacks, these questions became urgent matters of life and death for Matt Haig. And he began to look for the link between what he felt and the world around him. Notes on a Nervous Planet is a personal and vital look at how to feel happy, human and whole in the twenty-first century.


Shark Drunk by Morten Stroksnes

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Shark Drunk is, in part, the tale of two men in a very small boat on the trail of a very big fish. It is also a story of obsession, enchantment and adventure. A love song to the sea, in all its mystery, hardship, wonder and life-giving majesty. In the great depths surrounding the remote Lofoten islands in Norway lives the Greenland shark. Twenty-six feet in length and weighing more than a tonne, it can live for 200 years. Its fluorescent green, parasite-covered eyes are said to hypnotise its prey, and its meat is so riddled with poison that, when consumed, it sends people into a hallucinatory trance. Armed with little more than their wits and a tiny rubber boat, Morten Stroksnes and his friend Hugo set out in pursuit of this enigmatic creature. Together, they tackle existential questions, experience the best and worst nature can throw at them, and explore the astonishing life teeming at the ocean's depths.


The Inner Level by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett

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Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett's The Spirit Level, now published in more than twenty languages, has been one of the most influential non-fiction books published in the last decade, showing conclusively how less equal societies fare worse than more equal ones across a whole range of social measures - health, education, levels of violence, life expectancy and child wellbeing - and initiating the enormous public attention now given to the impacts of inequality. Based on an equally impressive range of data and analysis, The Inner Level now shows the impact inequality has on individuals: how it affects us psychologically, makes social relations more stressful, undermines self-confidence and distorts natural differences in personal abilities. It demonstrates that societies based on fundamental equalities, sharing and reciprocity produce much higher levels of wellbeing than those based on excessive individualism, competitiveness and social aggression. Like its predecessor, The Inner Level will transform ideas of how we should organise the way we live together.


Exactly by Simon Winchester

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Bestselling author Simon Winchester writes a magnificent history of the pioneering engineers who developed precision machinery to allow us to see as far as the moon and as close as the Higgs boson. Precision is the key to everything. It is an integral, unchallenged and essential component of our modern social, mercantile, scientific, mechanical and intellectual landscapes. The items we value in our daily lives - a camera, phone, computer, bicycle, car, a dishwasher perhaps - all sport components that fit together with precision and operate with near perfection. We also assume that the more precise a device the better it is. And yet whilst we live lives peppered and larded with precision, we are not, when we come to think about it, entirely sure what precision is, or what it means. How and when did it begin to build the modern world? Simon Winchester seeks to answer these questions through stories of precision's pioneers. Exactly takes us back to the origins of the Industrial Age, to Britain where he introduces the scientific minds that helped usher in modern production: John `Iron-Mad' Wilkinson, Henry Maudslay, Joseph Bramah, Jesse Ramsden, and Joseph Whitworth. Thomas Jefferson exported their discoveries to the United States as manufacturing developed in the early twentieth century, with Britain's Henry Royce developing the Rolls Royce and Henry Ford mass producing cars, Hattori's Seiko and Leica lenses, to today's cutting-edge developments from Europe, Asia and North America. As he introduces the minds and methods that have changed the modern world, Winchester explores fundamental questions. Why is precision important? What are the different tools we use to measure it? Who has invented and perfected it? Has the pursuit of the ultra-precise in so many facets of human life blinded us to other things of equal value, such as an appreciation for the age-old traditions of craftsmanship, art, and high culture? Are we missing something that reflects the world as it is, rather than the world as we think we would wish it to be? And can the precise and the natural co-exist in society?


The Boy Behind the Curtain by Tim Winton

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The Boy Behind the Curtain is a portrait of a life, a place and a man. In this deeply personal collection of true stories and essays Tim Winton shows how moments from his childhood and life growing up have shaped his views on class, faith, fundamentalism, the environment, and - most pressingly - how all his experiences have made him a writer.

From unexpected links between car crashes and faith, surfing and writing, to the story of his upbringing in the changing Australian landscape, The Boy Behind the Curtain is an impassioned, funny, joyous, astonishing collection of memories, and Winton's most personal book to date.


The King and the Catholics by Antonia Fraser

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The story of Catholic Emancipation begins with the violent Anti-Catholic Gordon Riots in 1780, fuelled by the reduction in Penal Laws against the Roman Catholics harking back to the sixteenth century. Some fifty years later, the passing of the Emancipation Bill was hailed as a 'bloodless revolution'. Had the Irish Catholics been a 'millstone', as described by an English aristocrat, or were they the prime movers? While the English Catholic aristocracy and the Irish peasants and merchants approached the Catholic Question in very different ways, they manifestly shared the same objective. Antonia Fraser brings colour and humour to the vivid drama with its huge cast of characters: George III, who opposed Emancipation on the basis of the Coronation Oath; his son, the indulgent Prince of Wales, who was enamoured with the Catholic Maria Fitzherbert before the voluptuous Lady Conyngham; Wellington and the 'born Tory' Peel vying for leadership; 'roaring' Lord Winchilsea; the heroic Daniel O'Connell. Expertly written and deftly argued, The King and Catholics is also a distant mirror of our times, reflecting the political issues arising from religious intolerance.


Arnhem by Anthony Beevor

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The great airborne battle for the bridges in 1944 by Britain's Number One bestselling historianOn 17 September 1944, General Kurt Student, the founder of Nazi Germany's parachute forces, heard the growing roar of aero engines. He went out onto his balcony above the flat landscape of southern Holland to watch the vast air armada of Dakotas and gliders,carrying the British 1st Airborne and the American 101st and 82nd Airborne Divisions. He gazed up in envy at the greatest demonstration of paratroop power ever seen. Operation Market Garden, the plan to end the war by capturing the bridges leading to the Lower Rhine and beyond, was a bold concept: the Americans thought it unusually bold for Field Marshal Montgomery. But the cost of failure was horrendous, above all for the Dutch who risked everything to help. German reprisals were cruel and lasted until the end of the war. The British fascination for heroic failure has clouded the story of Arnhem in myths, not least that victory was possible when in fact the plan imposed by Montgomery and General 'Boy' Browning was doomed from the start. Antony Beevor, using many overlooked and new sources from Dutch, British, American, Polish and German archives, has reconstructed the terrible reality of this epic battle. Yet this book, written with Beevor's inimitable and gripping narrative, is about much more than a single dramatic battle. It looks into the very heart of war.


Small Island by Little Train by Chris Arnot

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From stalwart little locomotives of topographic necessity, to the maverick engines of one man's whimsy, Britain's narrow-gauge steam trains run on tracks a world apart from its regimented mainlines. In Small Island by Little Train, eccentricity enthusiast Chris Arnot sets out to discover their stories. Stories include miniature railway on the Kent coast, used for Home Guard military trains during World War II, and now the school commute for dozens of local school children. The UK's only Alpine-style rack-and-pinion railway, scaling one of Britain's highest mountains. The five different gauges of railway circling one man's landscaped garden, and the team building their own trains to run on it.Far more than mere relics of the nation's industrial past, or battered veterans of wartime Britain, these are also stories of epic feats of preservation, volunteerism, tourism, and local history. They are an exploration of idiosyncrasy, enthusiasm and eccentricity. Or, to put it another way, a tale of Britishness.


Mrs Moreau's Warbler by Stephen Moss

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Swallow and starling, puffin and peregrine, blue tit and blackcap. We use these names so often that few of us ever pause to wonder about their origins. What do they mean? Where did they come from? And who created them?The words we use to name birds are some of the most lyrical and evocative in the English language. They alsotell incredible stories: of epic expeditions, fierce battles between rival ornithologists, momentous historicalevents and touching romantic gestures.Through fascinating encounters with birds, and the rich cast of characters who came up with their names, inMrs Moreau's Warbler Stephen Moss takes us on a remarkable journey through time. From when humans and birds first shared the earth to our fraught present-day coexistence, Moss shows how these names reveal as much about ourselves and our relationship with the natural world as about the creatures they describe.


The Order of Time by Carlo Rovelli

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The bestselling author of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics takes us on an enchanting journey to discover the meaning of time'We are time. We are this space, this plain opened by the traces of memory inside the connections between our neurons. We are memory. We are nostalgia. We are longing for a future that will not come.'Time is a mystery that does not cease to puzzle us. Philosophers, artists and poets have long explored its meaning while scientists have found that its structure is different from the simple intuition we have of it. From Boltzmann to quantum theory, from Einstein to loop quantum gravity, our understanding of time has been undergoing radical transformations. Time flows at a different speed in different places, the past and the future differ far less than we might think, and the very notion of the present evaporates in the vast universe.With his extraordinary charm and sense of wonder, bringing together science, philosophy and art, Carlo Rovelli unravels this mystery. Enlightening and consoling, The Order of Time shows that to understand ourselves we need to reflect on time -- and to understand time we need to reflect on ourselves.


The Curry Guy Easy by Dan Toombs

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Dan Toombs, The Curry Guy, has perfected the art of British Indian Restaurant (BIR) cooking. In his highly anticipated new book, Curry Guy Easy, Dan shares the secrets of fuss-free curries, ones that can be made in half the time but still taste as good as the takeaway. Dan has been besieged by requests for more curry house favourites, ones that can be cooked with very little equipment and faff, and without all the need for complex restaurant preparation. Here he shares long-awaited recipes for the likes of Chicken 65, Black Dhal, Aloo Chaat, Simple Dosas, Prawn Balti, Lamb Keema Saag, and many more. Whether it's getting your curry cooked and on the table speedily, or doing minimal chopping and mixing before popping into a pan to simmer away happily, Dan's dishes mean you spend less time on the washing-up and more on the enjoyment of eating. For BIR food lovers all over the world, this is an essential guide to making their favourite recipes at home. Dan has spent years researching the methods and secrets of Indian chefs and here he distills that knowledge into a fabulous collection of 100 simple, delectable dishes.


How to Talk to Children about Art by Francoise Barbe-Gall

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This is a children's art book for grown-ups.

In everyday language it shows how to explain to children what to look for and how to enjoy paintings as diverse as a Renaissance religious scene, an impressionist portrait or modernist masters like Kandinsky and Picasso.This new edition of How to Talk to Children about Art examines 30 paintings by great artists, from 1500 to the present day, in galleries around the world. The book gives examples of the kinds of questions a child might ask about the paintings, and provides straightforward answers. 'Who are the people in this painting?' 'Why has the artist used those colours?' 'How did the artist choose what to paint?' The book demystifies art appreciation and reveals that the simplest questions can be among the most pertinent. There is plenty that will stimulate children's interest in art and enlighten grown-ups too.


The Moth: All the Wonders by Catherine Burns

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From storytelling phenomenon The Moth: a collection about risk, courage, and facing the unknown, drawn from the best stories ever told on their stages. All These Wonders features voices both familiar and new. Storytellers include writer Jung Chang and comedian Louis C.K, as well as a hip hop 'one hit wonder', an astronomer gazing at the surface of Pluto for the first time, and a young female spy risking everything as part of Churchill's secret army during World War II. They share their ventures into uncharted territory - and how their lives were changed forever by what they found there. These true stories have been carefully selected and adapted to the page by the creative minds at The Moth, and encompass the very best of the 17,000+ stories performed in live Moth shows around the world. It is filled with a variety of humourous, moving, and gripping tales from all walks of life that will leave you speechless.


BBC Proms Guide 2018

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The BBC Proms is the world's biggest and longest -running classical music festival and one of the jewels in the crown for the BBC.

It is one of the strongest brand names in the music world and attracts a glittering array of artists and orchestras from the UK and around the world in over 150 concerts, talks, workshops and family events around London every summer.

Whether you're a first- time visitor or an experienced Prommer, watching at home or listening on radio or online, the BBC Proms Guide will help you to plan your summer of music and discover in depth what lies behind the Proms - from the composers to the performers to how the events are broadcast.


Factfulness by Hanes Rosling

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Factfulness: The stress-reducing habit of only carrying opinions for which you have strong supporting facts. When asked simple questions about global trends - why the world's population is increasing; how many young women go to school; how many of us live in poverty - we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers. In Factfulness, Professor of International Health and a man who can make data sing, Hans Rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators Anna and Ola, offers a radical new explanation of why this happens, and reveals the ten instincts that distort our perspective. It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most. Inspiring and revelatory, filled with lively anecdotes and moving stories, Factfulness is an urgent and essential book that will change the way you see the world.


Theft by Finding by Sedaris

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The point is to find out who you are and to be true to that person. Because so often you can't. Won't people turn away if they know the real me? you wonder. The me that hates my own child, that put my perfectly healthy dog to sleep? The me who thinks, deep down, that maybe The Wire was overrated? For nearly four decades, David Sedaris has faithfully kept a diary in which he records his thoughts and observations on the odd and funny events he witnesses. Anyone who has attended a live Sedaris event knows that his diary readings are often among the most joyful parts of the evening. But never before have they been available in print. Now, in Theft by Finding, Sedaris brings us his favorite entries. From the family home in Ralegh, North Carolina, we follow Sedaris as he sets out to make his way in the world. As an art student and then teacher in Chicago he works at a succession of very odd jobs, meeting even odder people, before moving to New York to pursue a career as a writer - where instead he very quickly lands a job in Macy's department store as an elf in Santaland... Tender, hilarious, illuminating, and endlessly captivating, Theft by Finding offers a rare look into the mind of one of our generation's greatest comic geniuses.


Gimson's Prime Ministers by Andrew Gimson

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A concise, sharp-witted and illuminating account of the lives of Britain's prime ministers from Walpole to May, illustrated by Martin Rowson. For the reader who has heard of such giants as Gladstone and Disraeli, and has drunk in a pub called the Palmerston, but has only the haziest idea of who these people were, Gimson's Prime Ministers offers a short account of them all which can be read for pleasure, and not just for edification.

With Gimson's wonderful prose once again complemented by Martin Rowson's inimitable illustrations, this lively and entertaining aide-memoire and work of satirical genius brings our parliamentary history to life as never before.


How to Garden When You're New to Gardening by Dorling Kindersley

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Let the RHS guide you through the surprisingly simple steps to creating a garden you can enjoy with your friends, and even show off to them.

Are you surrounded by weeds? Is your lawn forlorn? Are the bushes deceased?

Fear not!

How To Garden When You're New To Gardening shows you the basics to get your green space under control and keep it that way. With the expertise of the RHS, this book gives simple step by step instructions, with clear images to help you build your dream garden, no matter the size and scale.

Take the pain out of planting, potting, and pruning and enjoy your precious patch of land.

 


How to be Human by Ruby Wax

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It took us 4 billion years to evolve to where we are now. No question, anyone reading this has won the evolutionary Hunger Games by the fact you're on all 2's and not some fossil. This should make us all the happiest species alive - most of us aren't, what's gone wrong? We've started treating ourselves like machines and less like humans. We're so used to upgrading things like our iPhones; as soon as the new one comes out, we don't think twice, we dump it. (Many people I know are now on iWife4 or iHusband8, the motto being, if it's new, it's better.) We can't stop the future from arriving, no matter what drugs we're on. But even if nearly every part of us becomes robotic, we'll still, fingers crossed, have our minds, which, hopefully, we'll be able use for things like compassion, rather than chasing what's 'better' and if we can do that we're on the yellow brick road to happiness. I wrote this book with a little help from a monk, who explains how the mind works, also gives some mindfulness exercises, and a neuroscientist who explains where everything that makes us can be found in the brain. We answer every question you've ever had about: evolution, thoughts, emotions, the body, addictions, relationships, kids, the future and compassion. How to be Human is extremely funny, true and the only manual you'll need to help you upgrade your mind as much as you've upgraded your iPhone.


Istanbul by Bettany Hughes

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Istanbul has always been a place where stories and histories collide and crackle, where the idea is as potent as the historical fact. From the Qu'ran to Shakespeare, this city with three names - Byzantium, Constantinople, Istanbul - resonates as an idea and a place, and overspills its boundaries - real and imagined. Standing as the gateway between the East and West, it has served as the capital of the Roman, Byzantine, Latin and Ottoman Empires. For much of its history it was known simply as The City, but, as Bettany Hughes reveals, Istanbul is not just a city, but a story. In this epic new biography, Hughes takes us on a dazzling historical journey through the many incarnations of one of the world's greatest cities. As the longest-lived political entity in Europe, over the last 6,000 years Istanbul has absorbed a mosaic of micro-cities and cultures all gathering around the core. At the latest count archaeologists have measured forty-two human habitation layers. Phoenicians, Genoese, Venetians, Jews, Vikings, Azeris all called a patch of this earth their home. Based on meticulous research and new archaeological evidence, this captivating portrait of the momentous life of Istanbul is visceral, immediate and scholarly narrative history at its finest.


Magna Carta by Dan Jones

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On a summer's day in 1215 a beleaguered English monarch met a group of disgruntled barons in a meadow by the river Thames named Runnymede. Beset by foreign crisis and domestic rebellion, King John was fast running out of options. On 15 June he reluctantly agreed to fix his regal seal to a document that would change the world. A milestone in the development of constitutional politics and the rule of law, the 'Great Charter' established an Englishman's right to Habeas Corpus and set limits to the exercise of royal power. For the first time a group of subjects had forced an English king to agree to a document that limited his powers by law and protected their rights. Dan Jones's elegant and authoritative narrative of the making and legacy of Magna Carta is amplified by profiles of the barons who secured it and a full text of the charter in both Latin and English.


Women and Power: A Manifesto by Mary Beard

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Why the popular resonance of 'mansplaining' (despite the intense dislike of the term felt by many men)? It hits home for us because it points straight to what it feels like not to be taken seriously: a bit like when I get lectured on Roman history on Twitter. Britain's best-known classicist Mary Beard, is also a committed and vocal feminist. With wry wit, she revisits the gender agenda and shows how history has treated powerful women. Her examples range from the classical world to the modern day, from Medusa and Athena to Theresa May and Elizabeth Warren. Beard explores the cultural underpinnings of misogyny, considering the public voice of women, our cultural assumptions about women's relationship with power, and how powerful women resist being packaged into a male template. With personal reflections on her own experiences of the sexism and gendered aggression she has endured online, Mary asks: if women aren't perceived to be within the structures of power, isn't it power that we need to redefine?


Life in the Garden by Penelope Lively

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The two central activities in my life - alongside writing - have been reading and gardening.

Penelope Lively has always been a keen gardener.

This book is partly a memoir of her own life in gardens: the large garden at home in Cairo where she spent most of her childhood, her grandmother's garden in a sloping Somerset field, then two successive Oxfordshire gardens of her own, and the smaller urban garden in the North London home she lives in today.

It is also a wise, engaging and far-ranging exploration of gardens in literature, from Paradise Lost to Alice in Wonderland, and of writers and their gardens, from Virginia Woolf to Philip Larkin.


The Secret Life of the Owl by John Lewis-Stempel

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`Dusk is filling the valley. It is the time of the gloaming, the owl-light. Out in the wood, the resident tawny has started calling, Hoo-hoo-hoo-h-o-o-o.'There is something about owls. They feature in every major culture from the Stone Age onwards. They are creatures of the night, and thus of magic. They are the birds of ill-tidings, the avian messengers from the Other Side. But owls - with the sapient flatness of their faces, their big, round eyes, their paternal expressions - are also reassuringly familiar. We see them as wise, like Athena's owl, and loyal, like Harry Potter's Hedwig. Human-like, in other words.

No other species has so captivated us.

In The Secret Life of the Owl, John Lewis-Stempel explores the legends and history of the owl. And in vivid, lyrical prose, he celebrates all the realities of this magnificent creature, whose natural powers are as fantastic as any myth.


Talking to my Daughter about the Economy by Yanis Varoufakis

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Why is there so much inequality?

In this short book, world famous economist Yanis Varoufakis sets out to answer his eleven-year-old daughter Xenia's deceptively simple question.

Using personal stories and famous myths - from Oedipus and Faust to Frankenstein and The Matrix - he explains what the economy is and why it has the power to shape our lives.

Intimate yet universally accessible, Talking To My Daughter About the Economy introduces readers to the most important drama of our times, helping to make sense of a troubling world while inspiring us to make it a better one.


Rick Stein: The Road to Mexico

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Rick Stein brings his unrivalled enthusiasm and trusted expertise to the fresh, flavourful food of Mexico and California. No one better captures the food essence of a country and brings the best recipes into our kitchens like Rick.

Starting in San Francisco and Baja California, and working his way down to the southernmost tip of Mexico, Rick Stein cooks, eats and experiences Mexican food at its very best and most diverse. Packed with vegetables, centred around fresh ingredients and always high on flavour, Mexican and California cooking is naturally healthy and satisfying - from the incredible seafood of the north Pacific coast and the mole of Oaxaca, to the spices and salsas of Yucatan and Quintana Roo.

With the trademark beautiful photography and evocative design of Rick's books, this cookbook will encourage anyone to try out the bold food of these sunshine states.


Citizen Clem by John Bew

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Clement Attlee was the Labour prime minister who presided over Britain's radical postwar government, delivering the end of the Empire in India, the foundation of the NHS and Britain's place in NATO. Called 'a sheep in sheep's clothing', his reputation has long been that of an unassuming character in the shadow of Churchill. But as John Bew's revelatory biography shows, Attlee was not only a hero of his age, but an emblem of it; and his life tells the story of how Britain changed over the twentieth century.

Here, Bew pierces Attlee's reticence to examine the intellect and beliefs of Britain's greatest - and least appreciated - peacetime prime minister.

This edition includes a new preface by the author in response to the 2017 general election.


Belonging by Simon Schama

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The Jewish story is a history that is about, and for, all of us. And in our own time of anxious arrivals and enforced departures, the Jews' search for a home is more startlingly resonant than ever. Belonging is a magnificent cultural history abundantly alive with energy, character and colour. It spans centuries and continents, from the Jews' expulsion from Spain in 1492 it navigates miracles and massacres, wandering, discrimination, harmony and tolerance; to the brink of the twentieth century and, it seems, a point of profound hope. It tells the stories not just of rabbis and philosophers but of a poetess in the ghetto of Venice; a boxer in Georgian England; a general in Ming China; an opera composer in nineteenth-century Germany. The story unfolds in Kerala and Mantua, the starlit hills of Galilee, the rivers of Colombia, the kitchens of Istanbul, the taverns of Ukraine and the mining camps of California. It sails in caravels, rides the stage coaches and the railways; trudges the dawn streets of London, hobbles along with the remnant of Napoleon's ruined army. Through Schama's passionate telling of this second chronicle in an epic tale, a history emerges of the Jewish people that feels it is the story of everyone, of humanity.


The Secret Life of Cows by Rosamund Young

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'A lovely, thoughtful little book about the intelligence of cows.'

James Rebanks, author of The Shepherd's Life Cows are as varied as people.

They can be highly intelligent or slow to understand; vain, considerate, proud, shy, or inventive.

Although much of a cow's day is spent eating, they always find time for extracurricular activities such as babysitting, playing hide and seek, blackberry picking, or fighting a tree.

This is an affectionate record of a hitherto secret world.


Down to Earth by Monty Don

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Unrivalled gardening wisdom from Monty Don.

Written as he talks, this is Monty Don right beside you in the garden, challenging norms and sharing advice.

Month-by-month, Monty reveals the jobs he does in his own garden, that he hopes are relevant to you.

Discover Monty's thoughts and musings on nature, seasons, colour, design, pests, flowering shrubs, containers, and much more. Monty's intimate and lyrical writing is accompanied by photos of his own garden.

"I have written many gardening books but this is the distillation of 50 years of gardening experience. It has all the tips and essential pieces of knowledge that enable you to make your garden grow well, and it also shares my view that gardening is the secret to living well too." - Monty


Britain's 100 Best Railway Stations by Simon Jenkins

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It is the location of all our hopeful beginnings and intended ends; an institution with its own rituals and priests; and a long-neglected aspect of Britain's architecture: the railway station.Bestselling historian Simon Jenkins has travelled the length and breadth of the country to select this joyous celebration of our social history.

With his usual insight and authority, he describes the history, geography, design and significance of each of these glories; explores their role in the national imagination; champions the engineers, architects and rival companies that made them possible; and tells the story behind the development, triumphs and follies of these very British creations.

From Waterloo to Whitby, St Pancras to Stirling, these are the marvellous, often undersung places that link our nation. All aboard!


Optimism over Despair by Noam Chomsky

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An essential overview of the problems of our world today -- and how we should prepare for tomorrow -- from the world's leading public intellectual We have two choices. We can be pessimistic, give up, and help ensure that the worst will happen. Or we can be optimistic, grasp the opportunities that surely exist, and maybe help make the world a better place. Not much of a choice.

From peerless political thinker Noam Chomsky comes an exploration of rising neoliberalism, the refugee crisis in Europe, the Black Lives Matter movement, the dysfunctional US electoral system, and the prospects and challenges of building a movement for radical change. Including four up-to-the-minute interviews on the 2016 American election campaign and global resistance to Trump, this Penguin Special is a concise introduction to Chomsky's ideas and his take on the state of the world today.


Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight by Naoki Higashida

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FALL DOWN SEVEN TIMES, GET UP EIGHT is Naoki Higashida's gently subversive follow-up to his phenomenally popular book THE REASON I JUMP, which he wrote as a 13-year-old boy with severe autism. Now he shares his thoughts and experiences as a young man, exploring a range of topics from education, identity, family and society to personal growth. He has also written an enigmatic story, 'A Journey', especially for this edition, which is introduced by David Mitchell (co-translator with KA Yoshida). Part memoir, part critique of a world that sees disabilities ahead of disabled people, it opens a window into the mind and world of an autistic, non-verbal young adult, providing remarkable insights into autism in general.


The Clever Guts Diet by Michael Mosley

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Your gut is astonishingly clever. It contains millions of neurons - as many as you would find in the brain of a cat - and is home to the microbiome, an army of microbes that influences your mood, weight and immune system. In this groundbreaking book, Dr Mosley takes us on a revelatory journey through the gut, showing how junk food and overuse of antibiotics have wiped out many "good" gut bacteria, leading to a modern plague of allergies, food intolerances and obesity. Setting the record straight on everything from prebiotics to probiotics, fermented foods to fasting, Dr Mosley provides scientifically proven ways to control your appetite and boost your mood. The Clever Guts Diet is packed with delicious, healing recipes, menu plans, checklists and tips - all the tools you need to transform your gut and change the way you eat for ever.


Admissions: A Life in Brain Surgery by Henry Marsh

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. Henry Marsh has spent a lifetime operating on the surgical frontline. There have been exhilarating highs and devastating lows, but his love for the practice of neurosurgery has never wavered. Prompted by his retirement from his full-time job in the NHS, and through his continuing work in Nepal and Ukraine, Henry has been forced to reflect more deeply about what forty years spent handling the human brain has taught him. Moving between encounters with patients in his London hospital, to those he treats in the more extreme circumstances of his work abroad, Henry faces up to the burden of responsibility that can come with trying to reduce human suffering. Unearthing memories of his early days as a medical student, and the experiences that shaped him as a young surgeon, he explores the difficulties of a profession that deals in probabilities rather than certainties, and where the overwhelming urge to prolong life can come at a tragic cost for both patients and for those who love them. In this searing, provocative and deeply personal memoir, the bestselling author of Do No Harm finds new purpose in his own life as he approaches the end of his professional career, and a fresh understanding of what matters to us all in the end.


East West Street by Philippe Sands

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When he receives an invitation to deliver a lecture in the Ukrainian city of Lviv, international lawyer Philippe Sands begins a journey on the trail of his family's secret history. In doing so, he uncovers an astonishing series of coincidences that lead him halfway across the world, to the origins of international law at the Nuremberg trial. Interweaving the stories of the two Nuremberg prosecutors (Hersch Lauterpacht and Rafael Lemkin) who invented the crimes or genocide and crimes against humanity, the Nazi governor responsible for the murder of thousands in and around Lviv (Hans Frank), and incredible acts of wartime bravery, East West Street is an unforgettable blend of memoir and historical detective story, and a powerful meditation on the way memory, crime and guilt leave scars across generations.


Homo Deus by Yuval Noah Harari

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Sapiens showed us where we came from. Homo Deus shows us where we're going. War is obsolete. You are more likely to commit suicide than be killed in conflict. Famine is disappearing. You are at more risk of obesity than starvation. Death is just a technical problem. Equality is out - but immortality is in. What does our future hold? Yuval Noah Harari, author of the bestselling phenomenon Sapiens envisions a not-too-distant world in which we face a new set of challenges. Homo Deus explores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the twenty-first century - from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers?


Coming up

  • Watch this Space
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We have several events coming up over the next few months but we are just firming up details.

More to follow.....