• Welcome to Pitshanger Books

    A warm welcome to our website. Please feel free to explore the site and let us know what you think of it.
  • Your local independent bookshop

    Located on lovely, leafy Pitshanger Lane. We stock over 3000 titles. As well as books, we sell cards, wrapping paper, stationery and games.
  • Serving our community

    Everybody that works here lives locally. We all love the area and we all love books so please feel free to ask if there's anything you need.
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Book of the Week

Dearest Squirrel: The Intimate Letters of John Osborne and Pamela Lane

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A completely fresh insight into the mind of one of the UK's greatest playwrights, the letters between John Osborne and his first wife, actressPamela Lane, are also a love letter to a now defunct system of repertory theatre, and life in post-war Britain.As these letters reveal, soon after their divorce, Osborne and Lane began a mutually supportive, loyal, frequently stormy and sometimes sexually intimate alliance lasting thirty years until Osborne's death. By the mid-1980s, they had become closer and more trusting than they had been since their earliest years together. `You are for me what you always were,' Pamela told him, `I am in love with you still.' It is, he declared, `my fortune to have loved someone for a lifetime.'Acerbic, witty, candid and heartbreaking, they reveal a unique relationship, troubled, tender and enduring.


Book at Bedtime

The One who Wrote Destiny by Nikesh Shukla

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Mukesh has just moved from Kenya to the drizzly northern town of Keighley. He was expecting fame, fortune, the Rolling Stones and a nice girl, not poverty, loneliness and racism. Still, he might not have found Keith Richards, but he did find the girl. Neha is dying. Lung cancer, a genetic gift from her mother and an invocation to forge a better relationship with her brother and her widowed father before it's too late. The problem is, her brother is an unfunny comedian and her idiot father is a first-generation immigrant who moved to Keighley of all places. Rakesh is grieving. He lost his mother and his sister to the same illness, and his career as a comedian is flat-lining. Sure, his sister would have claimed that it was because he was simply unfunny, but he can't help feel that there is more to it than that - more to do with who he is and where he comes from rather than the content of his jokes. Ba has never looked after her two young grandchildren before. After her daughter died, her useless son-in-law dumped them on her doorstep for a month and now she has to try and work out how to bond with two children who are used to England, not to the rhythms of Kenya...

New Local Title

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We are always lamenting the fact that there are so few books about local history so we were thrilled to discover this new book about Gunnersbury Park which marks the completion of the recent and extensive conservation programme - its 21st century transformation - in the lead-up to the Park centenary. Published to coincide with the Gunnersbury Park Museum's reopening in spring/summer 2018. Gunnersbury Park receives 30,000-40,000 visitors per year, and this is expected to rise to as many as 1 million visitors per year after the renovation and conservation programme is completed.

In the Middle Ages, Gunnersbury belonged to the powerful mistress of a medieval king. Prosperous Tudor merchants and City aldermen followed; its first transformation saw the building of a huge Palladian mansion with formal gardens around 1660. After years of neglect it was reborn as a centre of Georgian society; a merchant politician and art collector and then a Hanoverian princess each softened the landscape and built follies. In 1800 the mansion was demolished and development plots sold off; two neighbouring villas emerged which still survive.

From 1835 one was home to the banking family who eventually reunited the estate, and this building is now the Gunnersbury Park Museum. Gunnersbury was opened as a public park in 1926.

 

These are the books that were most popular with our customers last week......

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1. Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor

2. Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout

3. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

4. The Party by Elizabeth Day

5. Persons Unknown by Susie Steiner

6. The House of Names by Colm Toibin

7. Theft by Finding by David Sedaris

8. Factfulness by Hans Rosling

9. Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls 2

10. Stay with Me by Ayobami Adebayo

If you would like to read any of these books, please send us a message from our contacts page, and we will reserve a copy for you.

Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

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When a mysterious package is delivered to Robin Ellacott, she is horrified to discover that it contains a woman's severed leg.Her boss, private detective Cormoran Strike, is less surprised but no less alarmed. There are four people from his past who he thinks could be responsible - and Strike knows that any one of them is capable of sustained and unspeakable brutality.With the police focusing on the one suspect Strike is increasingly sure is not the perpetrator, he and Robin take matters into their own hands, and delve into the dark and twisted worlds of the other three men. But as more horrendous acts occur, time is running out for the two of them...A fiendishly clever mystery with unexpected twists around every corner, Career of Evil is also a gripping story of a man and a woman at a crossroads in their personal and professional lives. You will not be able to put this book down.

Coming up

  • Watch this Space
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We have several events coming up over the next few months but we are just firming up details.

More to follow.....